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@InProceedings{Goergen:2014:MEVS,

Author = {Ralph G{\"o}rgen and Jan--Hendrik Oetjens},
Title = {Modellbasierte Entwicklung und Verifikation von Sensor--SiPs},
Year = {2014},
Month = {07},
Abstract = {MEMS--Sensoren sind die Sinnesorgane moderner technischer Systeme. Bosch bringt mit diesen winzigen Hightech--Helfern Autos und modernen Elektronikger{\"a}ten das F{\"u}hlen bei. Zentrale Anforderungen an derartige Systeme sind hohe Zuverl{\"a}ssigkeit und Robustheit {\"u}ber lange Zeitr{\"a}ume und das in einer bez{\"u}glich Vibrationen, Temperaturen und elektromagnetischer St{\"o}rungen oft sehr ung{\"u}nstigen Umgebung. Hinzu kommen steigende Komplexit{\"a}t der Systeme, zunehmende Miniaturisierung und immer dichtere Integration der Komponenten. Entwicklung und Verifikation solcher Systeme w{\"a}re nicht m{\"o}glich ohne modellbasierte und werkzeuggest{\"u}tzte Methoden, die insbesondere dem heterogenen Aufbau von Sensor--SiPs Rechnung tragen.},
Booktitle = {MATLAB EXPO 2014}

}

@InProceedings{Lorenz:2014:TPSMM,

Title                    = {Trace-Based Power State Machine Modelling},
Author                   = {Lorenz, Daniel and Gr\"{u}ttner, Kim and Ortland, Vincent},
Booktitle                = {Proceedings of the Forum on specification and Design Languages (FDL'2014)},
Year                     = {2014},
Abstract                 = {Due to the increasing algorithmic complexity of todays embedded systems, the consideration of extra-functional properties becomes even more important. Extra-functional properties such as timing, power consumption, and temperature need to be validated against given requirements on all abstraction levels. For timing and power consumption at RT- and gate-level, several techniques are available, but there is still a lack of methods and tools for power estimation and analysis at electronic system level (ESL) and above. In todays systems most of the hardware is not design from scratch, but bought as black-box components from IP vendors. Our Power State Machine (PSM) model enables power simulation of these components at ESL by deriving the power of communication at the component’s interfaces. In this work we present an Eclipse plug-in which supports the designer or user of a black-box IP component in creating the PSM model based on gate-level simulations and power estimations.},
File                     = {Lorenz2014a.pdf},

}

@InProceedings{Lorenz:2014:DSPCSBRICSL,

Title                    = {Data- and State-Dependent Power Characterisation and Simulation of Black-Box {RTL IP} Components at System Level},
Author                   = {Daniel Lorenz and Kim Gr\"{u}ttner and Wolfgang Nebel},
Booktitle                = {17th Euromicro Conference on Digital Systems Design (DSD 2014)},
Year                     = {2014},
Abstract                 = {Due to the increasing algorithmic complexity of todays embedded systems, the consideration of extra-functional properties becomes even more important. Extra-functional properties such as timing, power consumption, and temperature need to be validated against given requirements on all abstraction levels. For timing and power consumption at RT- and gate-level, several techniques are available, but there is still a lack of methods and tools for power estimation and analyses at electronic system level (ESL) and above. Existing ESL methods in most cases use state-based methods for power simulation. This may lead to inaccurate results, especially for data-dependent designs. In this paper, we extend the Power State Machine (PSM) model for black-box RTL IP components with a mechanism that employs data-dependent switching activity using the Hamming distance (HD). In pipelined designs, we do not only consider the input HD but also the HDs of the internal pipeline stage registers. Since these registers of black-box IP are not observable from the outside, our model derives the internal HDs from previous input data. The results show that our extension achieves up to 38% better results than the previous PSM approach and up to 35% better results compared to a model considering only the input HD.},
File                     = {Lorenz2014.pdf},

}

@INPROCEEDINGS{jwalter_raspi_rtsim_2014, Author = {Walter, J{\“o}rg and Fakih, Maher and Gr{\”u}ttner, Kim}, Title = {Hardware–Based Real–Time Simulation on the Raspberry Pi}, Year = {2014}, Month = {01}, booktitle = {2nd Workshop on High-performance and Real-time Embedded Systems (HiRES 2014)}, abstract = {Hardware prototypes are commonly used during embedded control unit design. Existing commercial tools offer an integrated workflow from mathematical models down to hardware simulation. Researchers also build low-cost simulation platforms out of commodity equipment. We present a platform that is an order of magnitude cheaper than existing systems but still easy to integrate into present workflows: Within an existing model-driven design methodology, we perform real-time hardware simulation using the Raspberry Pi single-board computer to simulate an electromechanical system with little development effort.}, file = {2014_walter_raspi_rtsim.pdf} }

@MISC{jwalter_motorbrain_booth_2014, Author = {Sven Rosinger, Maher Fakih and J{\“o}rg Walter}, Title = {MOTORBRAIN: MODEL–BASED DESIGN AND VIRTUAL INTEGRATION OF AN INTELLIGENT AND SAFE ELECTRICAL POWERTRAIN}, Year = {2014}, Month = {03}, abstract = {Hardware prototypes and hardware in the loop simulations are commonly used during embedded vehicle– and motor–control unit design. This demonstrator presents a platform that is an order of magnitude cheaper than existing systems but still easy to integrate into present workflows: Within an existing model–driven design methodology, a real–time hardware simulation is performed using the Raspberry Pi single–board computer to simulate an e–motor with little development effort and in conjunction with an industrial motor control unit.}, Howpublished = {DATE 2014 University Booth} }

@INPROCEEDINGS{knocke_earlyestimation_2014, Author = {Patrick Knocke and Ralph G{\”o}rgen and J{\“o}rg Walter and Domenik Helms and Wolfgang Nebel}, Title = {Using early power and timing estimations of massively heterogeneous computation platforms to create optimized HPC applications}, Year = {2014}, Month = {08}, abstract = {The ever rising energy and accordingly cooling demands are a major hurdle for the scalability of todays supercomputers. We are challenged with the need to increase computation performance to cope with the rising complexity of calculations on the one hand and the need to keep the energy/cooling demand stable or in the best case even to reduce it. Recently, one widely discussed way to do this is the integration of heterogeneous computation devices into the supercomputer systems as these tend to have a far better performance/energy ratio for large classes of applications. The obvious drawback of heterogeneous systems is the additional design complexity for the software development in order to efficiently use these devices in terms of performance as well as power. For this reason we propose a flow, which assists the soft– ware developer at design time, offering immediate power– and performance–estimation. Such approaches are already known in the embedded world, helping there to select between different design possibilities, and will be used to get the best possible per– formance from a massively heterogeneous computation platform, while still keeping the energy consumption in mind.}, Booktitle = {Proceedings of 2014 International Conference on Embedded and Ubiquitous Computing (EUC 2014)}, Organization = {IEEE}, Keywords = {Computer aided software engineering; Multicore processing; Performance analysis; System analysis and design;}, file = {2014_knocke_euc.pdf} }

@INPROCEEDINGS{Schreiner:2014:SORT,

author={Schreiner, S{\"o}ren and Gr\"{u}ttner, Kim and Rosinger, Sven and Rettberg, Achim}, 
booktitle={Object/Component/Service-Oriented Real-Time Distributed Computing (ISORC), 2014 IEEE 17th International Symposium on}, 
title={Autonomous Flight Control Meets Custom Payload Processing: A Mixed-Critical Avionics Architecture Approach for Civilian UAVs}, 
year={2014}, 
month={June}, 
pages={348-357}, 
abstract={Multi-rotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are interesting for commercial as well as for private use. Simple tasks like aerial photography are well known, but nowadays new scenarios, like on-board video processing or complex sensor data processing, are gaining in importance. These scenarios require high-performance on-board processing which is not available in most of today's avionics architectures for civilian multi-rotor systems. Due to the limited installation space and weight requirements, the usage of highly integrated Multi-Processor System on Chips (MPSoCs), capable to implement real-time critical flight control algorithms and compute intensive custom payload functions is appealing. This paper presents fundamental requirements on the architecture and flight control algorithms of existing autonomously flying commercial multi-rotor UAVs. On this basis a new approach for an avionics architecture using the Xilinx ZYNQ (MPSoC) is proposed. In combination with the presentation of the proposed architecture new challenges will be discussed that result from the integration of mixed-critical applications on a single chip.}, 
keywords={autonomous aerial vehicles;avionics;multiprocessing systems;parallel architectures;system-on-chip;MPSoC;Xilinx ZYNQ;aerial photography;autonomous flight control;autonomously flying commercial multirotor UAV;civilian UAV;civilian multirotor systems;complex sensor data processing;custom payload functions;custom payload processing;high-performance on-board processing;highly integrated multiprocessor system on chips;mixed-critical avionics architecture approach;multirotor unmanned aerial vehicles;on-board video processing;real-time critical flight control algorithms;Acoustics;Aerospace electronics;Computer architecture;Microcontrollers;Navigation;Payloads;Process control;MPSoC;Multi Processor System on Chip;Multi-rotos system;UAV;Unmanned Aerial Vehicles;Xilinx ZYNQ;avionics;extra-functional properties;mixed-criticality;payload processing;power consumption;temperature}, 
doi={10.1109/ISORC.2014.28}, 
ISSN={1555-0885},

}

bib/2014.txt · Last modified: 2015-02-18 14:17 by Sören Schreiner